7 secrets of shiva by devdutt pattanaik pdf free download

This article is about the goddess. WLA lacma 7 secrets of shiva by devdutt pattanaik pdf free download Goddess Parvati Orissa.

Each of her aspects is expressed with a different name, giving her over 100 names in regional Hindu stories of India. In Hindu belief, she is the recreative energy and power of Shiva, and she is the cause of a bond that connects all beings and a means of their spiritual release. 11th century sculpture from the British Museum. Parvati implies “she of the mountain”. Parvati is known by many names in Hindu literature. Two of Parvati’s most famous epithets are Uma and Aparna.

Ramayana, it is used as a synonym for Parvati. Shyama, as a calm and placid wife Parvati mentioned as Gauri and as a goddess who destroys evil she is Kali. Regional stories of Gauri suggest an alternate origin for Gauri’s name and complexion. The word Parvati does not explicitly appear in Vedic literature.

1st millennium BCE contains a goddess called Uma-Haimavati, a very common alternate name for Parvati. Uma and Ambika in the Upanishad, referring to Parvati is thus an embodiment of divine knowledge and the mother of the world. Sati-Parvati and Shiva acquire more comprehensive details. Agni, Parvati in Puranas text is a combination of wives of Rudra and Agni. Shivlinga icons are common for Parvati and Shiva. Parvati, the gentle aspect of Devi Shakti, is usually represented as fair, beautiful, and benevolent. When depicted alongside Shiva, she generally appears with two arms, but when alone, she may be depicted having four.

Ganesha, is on her knee, while her younger son Skanda may be playing near her in her watch. In ancient temples, Parvati’s sculpture is often depicted near a calf or cow – a source of food. Bronze has been the chief metal for her sculpture, while stone is next most common material. In ancient literature, yoni means womb and place of gestation, the yoni-linga metaphor represents “origin, source or regenerative power”. The linga-yoni icon is widespread, found in Shaivite Hindu temples of South Asia and Southeast Asia. The icon represents the interdependence and union of feminine and masculine energies in recreation and regeneration of all life. In some depictions, Parvati and Shiva are shown in various forms of sexual union.

For example, Kataka — representing fascination and enchantment, Hirana — representing the antelope, the symbolism for nature and the elusive, Tarjani by the left hand — representing gesture of menace, and Chandrakal — representing the moon, a symbol of intelligence. Tarjani mudra with the left hand, but far from devotee. Parvati’s right hand in Abhaya mudra symbolizes “do not fear anyone or anything”, while her Varada mudra symbolizes “wish fulfilling”. The hands mimic motherly gesture, and when included in a dance, the dancer symbolically expresses Parvati. Parvati is sometimes shown with golden or yellow colour skin, particularly as goddess Gauri, symbolizing her as the goddess of ripened harvests. In some manifestations, particularly as angry, ferocious aspects of Shakti such as Durga or Kali, she has eight or ten arms, and is astride on a tiger or lion.

In benevolent manifestation such as Kamakshi or Meenakshi, a parrot sits near her right shoulder symbolizing cheerful love talk, seeds and fertility. A parrot is found with Parvati’s form as Kamakshi – the goddess of love, as well as Kama – the cupid god of desire who shoots arrows to trigger infatuation. A crescent moon is sometimes included near the head of Parvati particularly the Kamakshi icons, for her being half of Shiva. Shiva keeps his word but first transforms her into a parrot. Parvati is expressed in many roles, moods, epithets and aspects. In Hindu mythology, she is an active agent of the universe, the power of Shiva. She is expressed in nurturing and benevolent aspects, as well as destructive and ferocious aspects.